Mark Chapter 14 Part 3

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Shalom and welcome to V’ahafta Yisroel, a Hebrew phrase which means you shall love Israel. We hope you’ll stay with us for the next 30 minutes as our teacher, Dr. Baruch shares his expository teaching from the Bible. Dr. Baruch is the senior lecturer at the Zera Avraham Institute based in Israel. Although all courses are taught in Hebrew at the institute, Dr. Baruch is pleased to share this weekly address in English. To find out more about our work in Israel, please visit us on the web at loveisrael.org. That’s one word, loveisrael.org. Now, here’s Baruch with today’s lesson.

Baruch:

If you knew that you were going to die tonight, a very painful, slow, torturous death, what would you be doing? Probably the last thing that you would be doing would be praising God, singing his songs, rejoicing with his people. But that’s exactly what we see concerning Messiah. Take out your Bible and look with me to the book of Mark and chapter 14. Now we left off last week with Messiah having that special meal with his disciples, that last supper. And we emphasize that it was not a Passover Seder, but the meal exactly 24 hours earlier, which was known as a [foreign language 00:01:27] a last supper, before a time of fasting on the 14th day of Nisan. And because we’ve learned the last two weeks that Messiah… Paul says, “He’s our Passover.” Therefore Messiah, he laid down his life, he died upon that tree on Passover Day.

Baruch:

And the reason why he did so on that day was to tell us what was the significance. What were the implications to him done on that, on that cross. That we would have a Passover experience as we’ve learned, a redemption, an eternal redemption experience with the living God. So where we left off last week was Messiah was sharing at that meal, that last supper, concerning the significance of that matzah, that unleavened bread and how it related to his body, and how that wine, the fruit of the vine, how it related to his blood, which would bring about a new covenant, the same covenant that Jeremiah prophesied in Jeremiah 31. And at the conclusion of that meal, look, if you would, to verse 26, there was something that was done. Verse 26.

Baruch:

Mark 14:26. And when they had finished singing… Now that is an important tool for helping us understand what’s going on. Because at the end of this [inaudible 00:03:01] it’s very similar to the Passover Seder what is done, and the ending of it has to do with reading or chanting a series of Psalms, Psalms 113 and until 118. And those Psalms are important because they reveal about the work of redemption. They manifest what Messiah came into the world to do. But also they are our psalms of praise and adoration to God. And it’s so significant. I mean, Messiah knew the timing. We saw last week that he was in charge, he was in control of everything, nothing was going to surprise him. He could foretell everything. And he knew that in a few short hours, he was going to be arrested, he was going to be tried, he was going to be condemned, he was going to be turned over to the Gentiles, the Romans, and ultimately put to death in a very barbaric manner.

Baruch:

And right before all of this started happening, what was he doing? He was rejoicing with his disciples, he was praising his heavenly father, and that is an element of faith. It reveals his true trust in our heavenly father. Verse 16, “And when they had finished singing, they went out into the Mount of Olives.”. Now that place, and we’ve talked about in our study of Mark’s gospel, that this place, the Mount of Olives is inherently related to Messiah. For example, in the book of Zechariah chapter 14, it tells us that Messiah is going to return to that place. We know that in the book of Acts, when Messiah ascended back into the heavens, he ascended from the Mount of Olives. So over and over, this place is important. It’s connected to the person and the work of Messiah Yeshua.

Baruch:

So after completing this [inaudible 00:05:08] this last supper, singing these hymns, it says that he went out to the Mount of Olives. Verse 27. And it says that Yeshua says to them, “All are going to be offended on account of me.” Now that’s important because that word is where we get the English word, scandalous. And we can look at it in two ways, their behavior is scandalous, that is offensive. Or it can simply mean, and I think both of these are right, that they were offended by him, what he had come to do. And that offense is rooted in pride. I mean, I’m not a perfect person. I haven’t done everything right, but do I really need someone to die for me? A prideful person says, “I’m not that bad.” But the reality is we’re even worse. We not only need someone to die, but we need a holy one, the living God’s son to lay down his life for us.

Baruch:

So when this was coming about, notice that the disciples were… What does it say about them? Verse 27. Notice what it says, “For it is written…” Here again, everything happens based upon scripture. Everything that Messiah does, it is scripturally founded. And he quotes once more from the prophet Zechariah, remember Zachariah focuses in on Messiah, his return, his work and that Mount of Olives. So it says verse 27, “For it’s written that I will strike the shepherd and the sheep will be made to scatter.” It’s in the passive. Because of what’s going to happen to him, they’re going to depart. And he says that very clearly to them. Verse 28, “But after I have been resurrected.” Now, last week we talked about the fact that there’s an emphasis, not just upon his death, but upon his resurrection. And once again, in our midst of our studies, we want to pay close attention to every aspect we can of the biblical text.

Baruch:

And this word that refers to his resurrection does not speak of him rising from the dead, but him being raised from the dead. Now I realize what the scripture says. The scripture says elsewhere, that Messiah, he has the authority, the power to lay down his life. No one takes it from him. And he says, “I have the authority, the power to pick it up. That’s true. But just because someone has the authority, doesn’t mean that he utilized it. Quite the contrary. He humbled himself and he subjected himself totally to his father, laying down his life, but also in the resurrection. And he states here, and this is an element of faith upon the Messiah. He says, “But after I have been raised.” Passive. And the father is going to raise him. Why is that important? Well, theologically, the fact that God has raised him from the dead speaks of God receiving that offering, that it being acceptable, proper, that it was done according to scriptural fulfillment.

Baruch:

So we read here in verse 28, “But after I have been raised from the dead, I will go before you unto…” Don’t miss this, “Unto Galilee.” Now probably from the time that you were very little, you’ve heard of this place in Israel, this region in the North of Israel called Galilee. But the significance of that term is more than just a location. This name Galilee has to do with something. Now, literally it comes from a Hebrew word which means to roll. And if you go to the Galilee, you see that the hills are just rolling hills and mountains. But there’s another aspect of this word, and that is revealing. For example, if you look some time at the book of Isaiah and chapter nine, it speaks about the Galilee. And it says that in the place of darkness, light is going to shine. Where? In Galilee. It’s a play on words.

Baruch:

Because Galilee has to do with revealing, so in the place of darkness, light’s going to shine. What’s that light going to do? Reveal. Now, up until this time we have seen over and over the disciples just don’t get it. We’ve seen that no one expected him to die except for that one woman that anointed him for burial. We see that, that same mentality about Messiah being struck, that is laying down his life, what’s going to happen? It tells us that the sheep are going to scatter. They’re not in line with God’s purposes. They don’t understand, it has not been revealed to them inwardly what Messiah is all about. Why? Because they’re still in darkness. They’re still thinking, according to their earthly thoughts, their desires. They want the kingdom, but they are not thinking about what must be accomplished for that kingdom to come.

Baruch:

So all of this is going to be revealed to them where? At the Galilee. So he says, “After I have been raised from the dead, I’m going to go before you.” To what place? The place of revelation, to Galilee. Verse 29. “But Peter says to him.” And remember that word but, it means in contrast. Messiah just says, “You all are going to be offended because of me. You’re all going to scatter away from me.” Now we’ve seen both last week and this week, Messiah’s talking as the omniscient God. He knows everything. Now he’s not causing these things to happen, but he knows what is going to happen. He’s in absolute control. And what happens? Well, Peter hears this and he says… And let me just put it into to our vernacular. He says, “You’re wrong.”

Baruch:

Now what pride it is. Someone is an utter darkness if he argues with God. And Peter simply did not understand who was in his midst. The son of the living God. So he says, look again, verse 29. And Peter says to him, “All might be offended, but I won’t.” He shows that he’s different. He says, “Okay, everyone else might do so, but I’ll never do so.” And Yeshua says to him, “Truly I say to you, this very night.” Now it’s one thing sometimes I make promises and I forget them. Sometimes I say, “I am going to do this in three days, four days.” And when it comes, I forget. But in this situation we’re talking about not days or weeks or months, we’re talking about a few short hours. And Messiah says to him in very, very emphatic language. He says, “I tell you the truth, that you, this very night before twice the rooster crows.

Baruch:

Now pay attention to this because it literally says the word deice in Greek, and this is the word twice. So why is that number two appearing? Well, understand what’s going on here. We have Peter’s statement, and we have Yeshua’s truth. Yeshua says, “You’re all going to deny me. You’re all going to scatter. You’re all going to be offended by me.” And Peter says, “No, I know the truth.” So you see this two appearing again, to help the reader understand this two divergent opinions. He says, look again, “This very night, before that rooster crows, twice, three times…” Three has the purpose of revealing something in the Hebrew understanding, “You are going to deny me three times.” Now, Peter, he heard that, but he didn’t accept it. He was constantly putting himself above the word of God. Verse 31. But all the more he was saying. Now, why is that important? That expression he was saying. Because it’s in the Greek imperfect.

Baruch:

Now, what is that? Well, we’ve talked about it. The Greek imperfect has to do with something that begins in the past, it extends to the future, but ends. There’s a change. So Peter is headstrong. He’s saying, “I will not do it. Others might, but I won’t.” But then reality is he’s coming to a time in the near future, where he’s going to understand that he was wrong. And people sometimes think, “Well, that’s the worst thing that can happen.” No. Sometimes finding out you are wrong, is the best thing that can happen to you. So he was saying, “Even if I should be bound with you over to death, that I should die with you”, he says, “I will not.” And he uses that double negative, which is emphatic. “I will never, ever deny you.” Not only was he saying this, but it says, and likewise, all the others were saying this.

Baruch:

Here again, the imperfect. They said it up into a point and things changed. Verse 32. “And they came into the place name Gat Shemen.” Now that’s important that you see that term, Gat Shemen in Hebrew. Now you know that’s Gethsemane. But I want us to hear it as the way that it’s literally pronounced, because it has meaning. Names were important. And the term Gat in Hebrew is a vat. There were a wine vat, but there was also an oil vat, what we would call an oil press or an olive press. And the fact that the last word is Shemen, well, that means oil from olive. So we know it was a place where there was a bunch of olive trees. And to this day, you can go to Gat Shemen, Gethsemane, and they’re still some olive trees there that go all the way back 2000 years to this very time.

Baruch:

Now, why is he here at this place of an olive press? Because think of that, this pressing. And that’s what’s going to happen here. He is going to be pressed between two things. His wants in the flesh, and also his father’s will. Now, even though we’ve talked about and we’ve emphasized both last week and this week about the divinity of Messiah, him being on mission, no less than God. The scripture says that he did not equate equality with God a thing to grasp, meaning he didn’t need to do anything to achieve that. He was fully God and is fully God. But we also need to see that in this moment, what’s going to be emphasized? His humanity. And that is an example for us. And what are we going to see? Well, let’s keep reading. And he came to the place called Gat Shemen, and he says to his disciples, “Sit here while I pray.”

Baruch:

Verse 33. And he takes Peter and Jacob, that is James and John with him. And he begins to what? Notice, to be amazed. Now this tells us about him beginning to be amazed for a period of time. And I believe that foreshadows, he was amazed by their lack of commitment to him. Now he knows all things, God knows all things. But when the scripture speaks about God being amazed, it’s to emphasize something, how big we have blown it. And in this passage… And understand what’s going to happen. In the previous chapter, we’ve dealt with the last days. And we’ve learned that there was a word that just repeated over and over. And that was a word to stand guard, to be ready, to be perceiving what was taking place. And this word’s going to reappear here in the garden of Gethsemane, and it’s within the context of a prayerfulness of watching. And what happens? Well, we’re going to see that they failed miserably.

Baruch:

Look, if you would again, to verse 33. He takes these three men, three, having to do with revelation, revealing something. He began to be amazed and also full of sorrow. Verse 34. And he says to them, “My soul is grieved even to death.” Now think, this is their rabbi. This is one that they spent three years following after, believing that he is the Messiah, the anointed one from God. And he says a couple of things. He says, “I want you to pray with me. I want you to stand guard because I am so sad. In fact, I am grieved. My soul is grieved unto death.” Now I don’t know how you could emphasize the importance of something any more than Yeshua did in this passage. And he says this, and then he responds, “Remain here…” And what? Here it is, this word, “And stand guard.” Or be on watch.

Baruch:

Verse 35. And he went a little further. He fell down upon the ground and he prayed. And this is what he prayed that if possible, that this hour should pass from him. Now, this is the important thing, we need to understand about true worship. There’s an individual, and he speaks about kind of a spiritual hedonism. And what he says is, God is never more pleased with us than when we’re pleased with him. That is when we agree with him. Well, that’s a false statement. It’s not us agreeing because we’re pleased with what God’s telling us. It is an example right here of sacrifice. I don’t have to understand things, I don’t have to agree with them, I’m limited in my knowledge. But if I obey nevertheless, well, that’s a true act of worship.

Baruch:

And this is what’s being epitomized here, Messiah in his flesh. Now remember, he never sinned, no, not once. But it says that he fell under temptation, and it’s natural. Every human being, no one wants to die a barbaric, torturous death. No one would rush to that, but if that’s God’s will, we’re going to see Messiah does it. He does it out of obedience, but in this passage, notice what it says. He prays diligently. He says if possible, let this hour pass from him. Verse 36. And he says, “Abba, Father…” Great term of intimacy. He says, “All is possible for you.” And he says here, “Then take this cup from me.” But here’s the real beauty. He says, “But not what I will, but what you…” And the implication is your will. What’s being emphasized here? Total surrender. And sometimes we’re called to do, in fact, most of the time we’re called to do what our flesh does not want to do.

Baruch:

And if we’re taught no, the greatest act of worship is when we say yes to the things of God and we agree with that, and we want the same things. Well, the problem is this, sometimes we don’t. Our flesh has to be brought into obedience, and that is greatest act of worship. Verse 37. And he returned to the place where those three disciples were, he came and he found them sleeping. And he says to Peter… Now notice the change here. It says that he says to Peter, but when he speaks, he says “Shimon.” or Simon, Shimon in Hebrew. The word Shimon means to listen and not just listen, but obey. So he doesn’t call him Peter, he calls him Simon and he says, “You sleep? Is it not possible for one hour…” To do what? That same word, watch, stand guard.

Baruch:

And don’t miss this. The reason why that word appears over and over here, just like it did in Mark 13, it shows us something. In the same way that these disciples, these three chief disciples, Peter, James and John, in the same way that they failed him in the garden, because they had their opinion, their wants, their desires. Because of that, we learn in Mark 13, that we’ll fail to stand guard, to watch, to be ready for the last days if we have that same tendency. So in the same way that they failed, we got to be careful that we don’t do that same thing in the last days. Once again, he says, “Was it not for one hour possible to watch, to stand guard?” Verse 38, “Watch and pray in order that you do not come into temptation, for the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.

Baruch:

Verse 39. “And again, he went away to pray the same words. And again, he came and he found them sleeping, for their eyes were…” What does your Bible say? Heavy. Now that’s important. Why? Because that is a well-known expression, having heavy eyes. Where we find it is in the book of Genesis concerning Yiṣḥāq or Isaac. Remember that those two brothers twins, ‘Esaw and Yaʿaqov, Jacob and Esau. Now, Rebecca had God’s prophetic truth revealed to her, but Yiṣḥāq did that. Isaac it’s said had heavy eyes, and therefore he was not understanding the things of God. He wanted to bless Esau, but God’s will was for Jacob to get it. So they use that same expression, heavy eyes, just as simply say that these disciples weren’t getting it. They did not understand the prophetic truth of scripture.

Baruch:

Verse 40 again, “When he came and he found them…” Notice what it says. “He came and he found them sleeping”, and it says, “And they did not know how to answer.” Now, that’s important. Why? Well, this word they did not know what to answer, this word, no, is in the pluperfect. And this construction pluperfect is the most remote. Meaning they were far away from being able to answer in order to respond. And one of the things that we need to ask ourselves is this, “Are we far away from the truth of God? Do we understand the prophetic truth of scripture? What’s going to take place? Are we conforming our lives to that truth? Are we understanding the signs and the seasons so that we can position ourselves in obedience to be exactly where God wants us to be, watching, standing guard and being faithful?”

Baruch:

Verse 41. He came a third time and he said to them, “Go ahead, sleep, take your rest. Enough.” Why? Because the time for prayer was over. Because it tells us in this passage that his hour had come. “Behold the one who delivers or betrays the son of man, he comes and he’s going to deliver the son of man into the hands of sinner.” He says, “Rise. Let us go because the betrayer, the one who betrays me, has come near. What we see is this, that there’s a time for prayer, there’s a time for preparation, and then there’s a time for response.

Baruch:

And if we’re not led by the Spirit of God, we’re not going to utilize that time for the proper purposes, and we’re going to be unprepared. And what’s going to happen? As we’re going to see next week, we’re going to see how those disciples failed, how they behaved in a scandalous manner. How they failed and they were offended of Messiah and they went their way. And that’s the key. They were always thinking about their way and therefore that’s where they went.

Baruch:

Let me conclude with this, which way are you walking? Are you being led by the Spirit? Are you secure in your understanding of what God is doing, what he’s going to do and how these events are going to happen in the last days to bring about the establishment of his kingdom? The time is near, you and I need to be ready.

Speaker 1:

Well, we hope you will benefit from today’s message and share it with others. Please plan to join us each week at this time and on this channel for our broadcast of loveisrael.org. Again, to find out more about us, please visit our website, loveisrael.org. There you’ll find articles and numerous other lectures by Baruch. These teachings are in video form. You may download them or watch them in streaming video. Until next week, may the Lord bless you in our Messiah Yeshua, that is Jesus, as you walk with him. Shalom from Israel.

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